Media Studies - Year 13

Media Studies Overview

Term 1: Component 3: Cross-media production (NEA)

Component 3 involves one cross-media production in two forms for an intended audience. Students will have to cover media language, representations, audiences and media industries (including digital convergence). The Statement of Aims & Intentions should be of 500 words approximately.

The following forms will always be set:

- Television

- Advertising & marketing (music or film)

- Magazines

The exam board will stipulate the industry and audience contexts, and specific key requirements to be included in the production.

Learners will develop a response to their chosen brief and create a production in a genre of their choice for the specified industry context and intended audience.

Teacher review

Re-shooting/re-drafting as necessary.

Final editing/design/polish of entire cross-media production.

Submission of cross media production – beginning of December

  1. Component 3: cross-media production (non-exam assessment 30%)

    Component 3 draws on the knowledge and understanding of the theories framework and the analytical skills developed in components 1 and 2, through the practical application of knowledge and understanding in a media product.

    Internally assessed and externally moderated.

    Create individual media production work for an intended audience, applying knowledge and understanding of:

    - Media language

    - Representation

    - Audiences

    - Media industries

    Statement of Aims & Intentions to explain how the learner intends to respond to the brief, apply knowledge and understanding of the theoretical framework and target the intended audience.

ANCHORAGE

The words that accompany an image (still or moving) contribute to the meaning associated with that image. If the caption or voice-over is changed then so may the way in which the audience interprets the image. An image with an anchor is a closed text;.

AUDIENCE CATEGORISATION

How media producers group audiences (e.g. by age, gender ethnicity) to target their products.

AUDIENCE POSITIONING

The way in which media products place audiences (literally or metaphorically) in relation to a particular point of view. For example, audiences may be positioned with a particular character or positioned to adopt a specific ideological perspective.

BRAND IDENTITY

The association the audience make with the brand, for example Chanel or Nike, built up over time and reinforced by the advertising campaigns and their placement.

CAMERA SHOTS

The type of shot and framing in relation to the subject, for example, close-up shots are often used to express emotion.

CAPTION

Words that accompany an image that help to explain its meaning.

CONVENTIONS

What the audience expects to see in a particular media text

COVER LINES

These suggest the content to the reader and often contain teasers and rhetorical questions. These relate to the genre of the magazine.

EDITING

The way in which the shots move from one to the other (transitions), e.g. fade, cut, etc. Fast cutting may increase the pace and therefore the tension of the text, for example.

FEATURE

In magazine terms, the main, or one of the main, stories in an edition. Features are generally located in the middle of the magazine, and cover more than one or two pages.

TARGET AUDIENCE

The people at whom the media text is aimed.

VISUAL CODES

The visual aspects of the product that construct meaning and are part of media language, for example clothing, expression, and gesture

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Learners will need to refine and reflect on their ideas and practical execution, developing their skills and awareness of strengths and weaknesses.

Create a supportive community:

At this stage, learners are encourages to support each other in their knowledge of software, editing techniques, etc and to share the skills they have developed.

Term 2: Component 2 Section B: Television, and Component 1 Section B: Video Games

Students will deconstruct ‘Life on Mars’ as part of the Television examination set texts.

In this unit, students will explore

• the way events, issue, individuals (including self-representation) and social groups (including social identity) are represented through processes of selection and combination; the way the media through re-presentation construct versions of reality

• how genre conventions are socially and historically relative, dynamic and can be used in a hybrid way

• the significance of the varieties of ways in which intertextuality can be used in the media.

As well as this, students will explore:

• Processes of production, distribution and circulation by organisations, groups and individuals in a global context

• the specialised and institutionalised nature of media production, distribution and circulation

• the relationship of recent technological change and media production, distribution and circulation

• the significance of patterns of ownership

Students will also cover the Industry and Audience section of the Component 1 examination, with particular focus on the Video Games set text – the ‘Assassin’s Creed’ franchise. They will explore: • processes of production, distribution and circulation by organisations, groups and individuals in a global context • the specialised and institutionalised nature of media production, distribution and circulation • the relationship of recent technological change and media production, distribution and circulation • the significance of patterns of ownership and control, including conglomerate ownership, vertical integration and diversification • the significance of economic factors, including commercial and not-for-profit public funding, to media industries and their products • the impact of digitally convergent media platforms on media production, distribution and circulation, including individual producers • how media producers target audiences

  1. Practice question from Component 2, Section A – television in the Global Age: one two-part question or one extended response
action code

something that happens in the narrative that tells the audience that some action will follow, for example, police chasing a criminal

audience consumption

the way in which audiences engage with media products

audience interpretation

The way in which audiences 'read' the meanings in media products

audience positioning

The way in which media products place audiences in relation to a particular point of view. For example, audiences may be positioned with a particular character.

audience response

How audiences react to media products

audio

How sound is used to communicate meaning - voice-over, dialogue, music etc.

avatar

A player's representation of themselves within a game.

back story

part of a narrative which may be the experience of a character or the circumstances of an event before the action or narrative of a media text.t

binary opposites

Where texts incorporate examples of opposite values; for example, good versus evil, villain versus hero.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Learners will extend their experience of the media through the study of products with which they may be less familiar, including those produced by or for a minority group, non-mainstream and non-English language products. This aims to develop knowledge and understanding of the transnational nature of the media, considering the effect of different national contexts on representations in media products, the global reach of media industries, and the targeting of audiences on a national and global scale.

Create a supportive community:

Studying texts with which all students will probably be unfamiliar means that they can work together to apply the skills developed through the course to analyse and interpret.

Term 3: Component 1 Section B: Television and Online Media

Students will deconstruct ‘The Bridge’ (Sweden/Denmark) as part of the Television examination set texts. In this unit, students will explore • the way events, issue, individuals (including self-representation) and social groups (including social identity) are represented through processes of selection and combination; the way the media through re-presentation construct versions of reality • how genre conventions are socially and historically relative, dynamic and can be used in a hybrid way • the significance of the varieties of ways in which intertextuality can be used in the media. As well as this, students will explore: • Processes of production, distribution and circulation by organisations, groups and individuals in a global context • the specialised and institutionalised nature of media production, distribution and circulation • the relationship of recent technological change and media production, distribution and circulation • the significance of patterns of ownership

Students will also prepare for Section C of the Component 2 examination by exploring a blog – ‘Zoella’. Websites and blogs are, by their very nature, dynamic and updated to respond to industry and audience needs. Learners are required to study the following elements of their chosen websites and blogs: • the design of the home page, including its use of images and topical material • links to other content, including audio-visual material such as the relevant YouTube channel, vlog etc. • interactive links, including to social and participatory media. Students will explore: • how the different modes and language associated with different media forms communicate multiple meanings • how developing technologies affect media language • the codes and conventions of media forms and products, including the processes through which media language develops as a genre • the dynamic and historically relative nature of genre • the processes through which meanings are established

  1. Exam-style focus on Television and on online media (30 mark extended answers)
brand identity

The association the audience make with the brand, for example the BBC, built up over time.

camera angles

The angle of the camera in relation to the subject. For example, a high angle shot may make them appear more vulnerable.

camera shots

The type of shot and framing in relation to the subject. For example, close-up shots are often used to express emotion.

channel identity

That which makes the channel recognisable to audiences and different from any other channel.

connotation

The suggested meaning attached to a sign, e.g. the sports car suggests speed and power.

conventions

What the audience expects to see in a particular media text.

convergence

The coming together of previously separate media industries and/or platforms, often the result of advances in technology.

denotation

The literal meaning of a sign, e.g. the car is red.

diegetic sound

Sound that comes from the fictional world.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Learners will be able to demonstrate a critical approach to media issues, demonstrate appreciation and critical understanding of the media and their role both historically and currently in society, culture, politics and the economy.

Create a supportive community:

Learners will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the global nature of the media, make informed arguments, reach substantiated judgements and draw conclusions about media issues.

Term 4: Component 2 Section C: Online media and Component 1 Section B: Radio

Students will prepare for Section C of the Component 2 examination by an online magazine – ‘Attitude’.

Websites and blogs are, by their very nature, dynamic and updated to respond to industry and audience needs. Learners are required to study the following elements of their chosen websites and blogs:

• the design of the home page, including its use of images and topical material

• links to other content, including audio-visual material such as the relevant YouTube channel, vlog etc.

• interactive links, including to social and participatory media.

Students will explore:

• how the different modes and language associated with different media forms communicate multiple meanings

• how developing technologies affect media language

• the codes and conventions of media forms and products, including the processes through which media language develops as a genre

• the dynamic and historically relative nature of genre

• the processes through which meanings are establish

Students will cover the Industry and Audience section of the Component 1 examination, with particular focus on the Radio set text – ‘Late Night Woman’s Hour'. They will explore: • processes of production, distribution and circulation by organisations, groups and individuals in a global context • the specialised and institutionalised nature of media production, distribution and circulation • the relationship of recent technological change and media production, distribution and circulation • the significance of patterns of ownership and control, including conglomerate ownership, vertical integration and diversification • the significance of economic factors, including commercial and not-for-profit public funding, to media industries and their products • the impact of digitally convergent media platforms on media production, distribution and circulation, including individual producers • how media producers target audiences

  1. Mock exam using past papers and exam-style questions.
fan

An enthusiast of a particular media form or product

Four Cs

This stands for Cross Cultural Consumer Characteristics and was a way of categorising consumers into groups through their motivational needs. The main groups were Mainstreamers, Aspirers, Explorers, Succeeders and Reformers.

ideology

A set of messages, values and beliefs that may be encoded into media products.

intellectual property

A legal concept which refers to creations of the mind for which the owner's rights are recognised. This cover words, phrases, symbols and designs.d

interactive audience

The ways in which audiences can become actively involved in a product, for example, by posting a response to a blog or live tweeting.

layout and design

The way in which a page has been designed to attract the target audience.

mediation

The way in which a media text is constructed in order to represent a version of events.

mode of address

The way in which a media text 'speaks to' its target audience.

niche audience

A relatively small audience with specialised interests, tastes and backgrounds.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Learners will explore the cross-media, multi-platform nature of the contemporary media and the centrality of online and social media platforms in distributing, accessing and participating in the media. They will explore the context of their relationships to other media forms and platforms, recognising their fluidity and the way in which they respond to emerging, contemporary developments in the digital landscape

Create a supportive community:

Studying products aimed at niche groups within society will widen learners' understanding and acceptance of lifestyles outside the mainstream.

Term 5: Exam revision

This unit will focus on preparation for both Component 1 and Component 2 examination.

Component 1:

• Section A: Analysing Media Language and Representation (45 marks)

• Section B: Understanding Media Industries and Audiences (45 marks)

Component 2:

• Section A: Television in the Global Age (30 marks)

• Section B – Magazines: Mainstream and Alternative Media (30 marks)

• Section C – Media in the Online Age (30 marks)

  1. Full SAM exam papers for both Component 1 and Component 2.
pick and mix theory

Suggested by British sociologist and media theorist David Gauntlett, summarised as audiences will select aspects of media texts that best suit their needs and ignore the rest.

production

The process by which media texts are constructed.

Products

Media texts

regulator

A person or body that supervises a particular industry.

sign/code

something that communicates meaning

stereotype

An exaggerated representation of someone or something.

sub-genre

Where a genre is subdivided into smaller categories each of which has their own set of conventions.

synergy

The combination of elements to maximise profits within a media organisation or product. For example, a film and soundtrack.

target audience

The people at whom the text is aimed.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

The development of study skills and revision techniques will build resilience and help the retention of knowledge.

Create a supportive community:

Group revision activities, peer teaching and flipped learning will all encourage learners to work together in a supportive way.